Kitchens for Tenants

Kitchens for Tenants

Kitchens for Tenants

Over the years the kitchen has evolved from a utilitarian workspace to the fundamental heart of the home. It often enhances open plan living areas so that couples and families can interact between preparing food, working at a desk or watching TV.

And just as homebuyers are impressed by a good kitchen, so, too, are tenants, with a recent survey suggesting that a third of Tenants regard the kitchen as the most important aspect of the property they rent.

Good Landlords, who achieve the highest yields and the longest tenancies, tend to invest in their kitchens. Here are some of our own tips for maximising the nation’s favourite room to your advantage:

1. When buying a buy-to-let property, unless the existing kitchen is immaculate, consider putting in a new one.
2. Today’s Tenants prefer larger, but fewer, spaces. Don’t be afraid to knock down the odd wall to open the kitchen into the living area (building structure permitting).
3. Avoid the type of ‘cheapo’ kitchen associated with rented properties from the 1980s. The best Tenants’ standards are no lower than those of homeowners.
4. If the carcasses are clean and solid, you can save money by replacing the cupboard doors, which is easy to do, and there is a huge choice of finishes. Go handle-less and there’s one less thing that can fall off!
5. Take advantage of the storage space offered by kitchen units to conceal clutter in a furnished let. A high wall unit is an ideal place to house a Wi-Fi router.
6. Clever storage solutions like a “magic corner” basket unit is one of those unexpected surprises that can impress a Tenant. Good storage also means that there is likely to be less clutter on display when the following Tenant looks round the property.
7. Upgrade the look of the kitchen by installing hidden remote colour controlled LED strip lighting for under £30.
8. Unless you have a huge expanse of worktop, consider granite. A granite worktop not only makes the kitchen look a $$$million, but you’ll avoid damage done to a regular worktop by inconsiderate placing of a hot pan.
9. You might be able to increase the useable space of the property by having a “return island” that doubles up as both workspace and breakfast bar, removing the expense and clutter of a dining table and chairs in a smaller home.
10. An obviously well-fitted and appointed kitchen is a sign that you, as Landlord, care. In return you can expect a higher rent and a more considerate Tenant, ultimately delivering a better return on your investment.

Please feel free to contact our Lettings Team on 01273-735237 for any advice about how to present your property to attract the right Tenant.